Dr. Glen S. Krutz’s appointment as dean of the Oklahoma State University College of Arts and Sciences became official Friday. The OSU/A&M Board of Regents voted to name him dean, professor and Puterbaugh Foundation Chair. 

“I am excited to join OSU’s largest college and the intellectual heart of this great American land-grant university,” Krutz said. “President (Burns) Hargis and Provost (Gary) Sandefur are big advocates for the liberal arts and sciences. In Oklahoma, now more than ever, it is important that students gain depth in these elemental fields of study, so as to make deep contributions to their community after graduating from OSU."

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Eve Ringsmuth spent her early years in a single-parent home, where her mom was determined to provide her with the same opportunities others enjoyed.

“I think she was from that generation where feminism was really coming into its own with more women entering the workforce,” Ringsmuth said. “For example, I remember participating in Take a Girl to Work Day with my mom and a few other people.”

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During his freshman year of high school in the state of Washington, Joseph Haley took a class in physics. Despite many warnings from friends and mentors about its difficulty, he took the challenge.

“You have to have a really solid math background to get into physics, but that was a moment in my life when it just clicked,” Haley explained. “I took that physics class and just took to it like a duck to water. I’m extremely lucky in the sense that I knew that’s what I wanted to do with the rest of my life.”

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Shane Hoffman is famous. If you haven’t heard of “Prof Hoff,” then you probably don’t play MARVEL: Contest of Champions or spend hours watching reviews of Oreos and pizzas.

His YouTube channel has more than 30,000 subscribers and over 11 million views. Hoffman, a 31-year-old New Mexico native and a professor in the School of Media and Strategic Communications, is not your typical college lecturer.

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Colton Flynn, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geography, got the amazing opportunity to go to Ethiopia for nine months to pursue his research thanks to the Fulbright Scholar Program. His research focused on an Ethiopian crop called tef.

“My research works on finding the health of the plant in agricultural fields using satellites. Then using a spectroradiometer we can predict the nutrient content of the plant and the seed in the field. Just by scanning the sun’s reflectance I am able to determine how much nutrient is in the crop or grain,” Flynn said.

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