We are all dealing with a sense of uncertainty and fear as we try to flatten the curve of COVID-19 pandemic. With that in mind, we are joined by Thad Leffingwell, a clinical health psychologist and head of the Department of Psychology. We discuss his tips for coping with coronavirus challenges, what the human mind is good at and how that leads to some of our biggest problems, and how teaching online is going for him.


The new normal of social distancing and shelter-in-place is challenging for all of us. Not only is it disruptive to our daily routines and favorite activities, but it creates stress and anxiety as we face an uncertain future and timeline. Worries about our health, our finances, and our family and loved ones seem to increase almost daily.

Dr. Thad Leffingwell, a clinical health psychologist and head of the Department of Psychology, offers the following tips for effective coping.

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While we are working remotely to try to flatten the curve of COVID-19 cases, we wanted to share this episode recorded in the studio on March 6. Matt Cabeen from the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics joins us to talk about the novel coronavirus and viruses more broadly as well as bacteria. His passion for the subject is obvious, and there are even a few explanations of the immune system you have probably never heard before.


Kristen Duncan and Christina Elliott from the OSU Museum of Art join us to talk about In the Mind of a Collector, an exhibition of work donated to OSU by Tulsa native George R. Kravis II in 2018. Numbering more than 700 works, the Kravis gift includes an area of the visual arts new to the museum—industrial design—as well as fine art. Selections range from the colorful, energized brushstrokes of Abstract Expressionist painter Hans Hofmann to the comic-book-inspired Pop Art of Roy Lichtenstein, and from a 1950s Frank Lloyd Wright chair to Streamline Style radios from the 1930s and 1940s. Kravis was one of the earliest and youngest founders of an FM radio station in the U.S., KRAV, and went on to become a philanthropist focusing on art education.


Kennedy Conrad’s dreams are filled with music. The Oklahoma native’s journey at Oklahoma State University started with an audition for the Michael and Anne Greenwood School of Music.

“There was just something about how the day was set up. It was run mainly by students. You get to meet with professors, but I thought it was really important that students were telling me about campus life, because they are the ones living it.”

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Numerous College of Arts and Sciences personnel actions were approved during the OSU/A&M Board of Regents meeting March 6 in Stillwater.

NEW APPOINTMENTS: Chelsea Silva, assistant professor, Department of English; Tingying Xu, assistant professor, Pickens School of Geology; Xukai Yan, assistant professor, Department of Mathematics; Rachel Lim, assistant professor, School of Media and Strategic Communications; Andre’ Chiang, assistant professor, Greenwood School of Music; and Devon Hunt, assistant professor, Department of Theatre.

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Growing up before the boom of cell phones helped Daniel Metroka's imagination come to life. The Fort Worth, Texas, native came to Oklahoma State University to study creative writing and further develop his love of literature. 

"I am so grateful that we grew up before the advent of phones," he said. "We had to read. We had to go outside. We had to create and not just be on an iPad all day. That stuck with me. I remember being 7 and saying that I was going to have a book published by age 10. That didn't happen but still."

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Samantha Homann graduated in December, taking only 3½ years to complete degrees in English and German. She was also a leader in many OSU campus organizations and an intern on the College of Arts and Sciences' Outreach and Communications team. She was recently hired as the team's marketing assistant with a focus on social media. She shares stories about her college experience and insight into how she is able to be so efficient. She also explains why she avoids saying the word "bag."